Propane Safety

Propane Safety

This link will take you to Propane 101, an informative site about propane safety.

Call 811 before you dig.

If You Smell Gas

Never assume a gas odor is a sign your tank is running low. If you smell gas in the house, or if you have a gas alarm that signals the presence of gas, IMMEDIATELY follow these suggestions:

No Flames or Sparks
Immediately put out all smoking materials and other open flames. Do not operate lights, appliances, telephones, or cell phones. Flames or sparks from these sources can trigger an explosion or a fire.

Shut Off the Gas
Turn off the main gas supply valve on your propane tank if it's safe to do so. To close the valve, turn it clockwise (see diagram below).

Report the Leak
From a neighbor's home or other nearby building away from the gas leak, call HomeWorks at 1-877-574-2740 right away. If for some reason you can't reach us, call 911 or your local fire department.

Leave Immediately
Get everyone out of the building or area of the suspected leak.

Do Not Return to the Building or Area
Do Not Return to the Building or area until we determine that it is safe.

Get Your System Checked
Before you attempt to use any of your propane appliances, a qualified service technician must check your entire system to ensure that it is leak-free.

Parts of a propane tank

Propane Safety Tips

Follow these general propane safety precautions to keep your home and family safe:

  • Be alert for the odor of propane when around a gas appliance or container.
  • If you smell gas, do not try to light the appliance. Call HomeWorks for a service technician to assist you.
  • Read and follow the operating and lighting instructions and warning labels provided by the appliance manufacturer.
  • The pilot has a safety device. If you have trouble keeping it lit, this device is warning you about a problem. Call a service technician to assist you.
  • Never force any appliance control. If you cannot operate the knobs, switches, or buttons by hand, call your supplier. NEVER tamper with the controls.
  • Keep combustibles, such as curtains, paper, cleaning fluids, etc., away from any energy source, including gas and electric appliances where they may cause a fire.
  • Have a B/C rated fire extinguisher readily available. Be sure it is charged and that you and your family know how to use it.

Carbon Monoxide Safety

Each year in America, unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning claims more than 500 lives and sends another 15,000 people to hospital emergency rooms for treatment.

What is carbon monoxide?
Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.

Where does carbon monoxide come from?
CO gas can come from several sources: gas-fired appliances, charcoal grills, wood-burning furnaces or fireplaces and motor vehicles.

Who is at risk?
Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning. Medical experts believe that unborn babies, infants, children, senior citizens and people with heart or lung problems are at even greater risk for CO poisoning.

What Actions Do I Take if My Carbon Monoxide Alarm Goes Off?
What you need to do if your carbon monoxide alarm goes off depends on whether anyone is feeling ill or not.

If no one is feeling ill:

  • Silence the alarm.
  • Turn off all appliances and sources of combustion (i.e. furnace and fireplace).
  • Ventilate the house with fresh air by opening doors and windows.
  • Call a qualified professional to investigate the source of the possible CO buildup.

If illness is a factor:

  • Evacuate all occupants immediately.
  • Determine how many occupants are ill and determine their symptoms.
  • Call your local emergency number and when relaying information to the dispatcher, include the number of people feeling ill.
  • Do not re-enter the home without the approval of a fire department representative.
  • Call a qualified professional to repair the source of the CO.

Protect Yourself and Your Family from CO Poisoning

  • Install at least one UL (Underwriters Laboratories) listed carbon monoxide alarm with an audible warning signal near the sleeping areas and outside individual bedrooms. Carbon monoxide alarms measure levels of CO over time and are designed to sound an alarm before an average, healthy adult would experience symptoms. It is very possible that you may not be experiencing symptoms when you hear the alarm. This does not mean that CO is not present.
  • Have a qualified professional check all fuel burning appliances, furnaces, venting and chimney systems at least once a year.
  • Never use your range or oven to help heat your home and never use a charcoal grill or hibachi in your home or garage.
  • Never keep a car running in a garage. Even if the garage doors are open, normal circulation will not provide enough fresh air to reliably prevent a dangerous buildup of CO.
  • When purchasing an existing home, have a qualified technician evaluate the integrity of the heating and cooking systems, as well as the sealed spaces between the garage and house. The presence of a carbon monoxide alarm in your home can save your life in the event of CO buildup.

Call Before You Dig

Planning a home improvement job? Planting a tree? Installing a fence or deck? WAIT! Here's what you need to know first:

Whether you are planning to do it yourself or hire a professional, smart digging means calling 811 three full working days before each job. Homeowners often make risky assumptions about whether or not they should get their utility lines marked, but every digging job requires a call – even small projects like planting trees and shrubs. The depth of utility lines varies and there may be multiple utility lines in a common area. Digging without calling can disrupt service to an entire neighborhood, harm you and those around you and potentially result in fines and repair costs. Calling 811 three full working days before every digging job gets your underground utility lines marked for free and helps prevent undesired consequences.

Propane service lines are not marked by 811
For your safety, please call HomeWorks Propane and we will mark your underground propane lines, if possible, for no charge.

Call 811 before you dig.

 

Together We Save